@zareen said in PSY504 GDB 1 Solution and Discussion: Previous memories/information interferes with new ones Interference is an explanation for forgetting in long term memory, which states that forgetting occurs because memories interfere with and disrupt one another, in other words forgetting occurs because of interference from other memories (Baddeley, 1999). Is it true in your case or not? YES! This idea suggests that information in long term memory may become confused or combined with other information during encoding thus distorting or disrupting memories. interference can cause forgetting: There are two ways in which interference can cause forgetting: Proactive interference (pro=forward) occurs when you cannot learn a new task because of an old task that had been learnt. When what we already know interferes with what we are currently learning – where old memories disrupt new memories. Retroactive interference (retro=backward) occurs when you forget a previously learnt task due to the learning of a new task. In other words, later learning interferes with earlier learning - where new memories disrupt old memories. an example from your everyday experiences. for example: confusing old and new telephone numbers. Chandler (1989) stated that students who study similar subjects at the same time often experience interference. Previous learning can sometimes interfere with new learning (e.g. difficulties we have with foreign currency when travelling abroad). Also new learning can sometimes cause confusion with previous learning. (Starting French may affect our memory of previously learned Spanish vocabulary). Memory over time: Over time, a memory becomes harder to remember. A memory is most easily recalled when it is brand new, and without rehearsal, begins to be forgotten.